Photo: Injidup Natural Spa, Jarrad Seng

4 blissful swimming spots made for summer

Shhh… these blissfully beautiful swimming spots make the perfect summer escape. Just don’t tell anyone!

From the serene waters of truffle country to the champagne fizz of a natural ‘spa’, WA’s South West is brimming with secret swimming spots. Here are four to get you started.

Injidup Natural Spa, Margaret River

Edged by a wide, smooth stone shelf, Injidup Natural Spa is filled with fresh saltwater so unusually clear and still, it often drops jaws. Don’t spend too long gaping, though – you might get the surprise of your life! The ‘spa’ gets its name from the surrounding waves, which occasionally spill over the pool’s border and filter down its sides, filling the water with natural, champagne fizz.

To get here, head to the end of Wyadup Road in the Margaret River town of Yallingup. Follow your nose downhill (to the left of the car park) before pursuing the trail as it curves right – there’s no signage, but a network of well-worn tracks will ensure you find your way.

Injidup Natural Spa
Photo: Injidup Natural Spa, Jarrad Seng

Elephant Rocks, Denmark

Picture a herd of elephants, wading through a jewel-toned pool of aqua water, and you’re getting the idea: hallmarked by a collection of oversized boulders, which dot the water of a sleepy little cove, Elephant Rocks is remarkably well-named (and beautiful to boot). This teeny bay, found 20 minutes from Denmark, has received plenty of social media attention for its striking good looks but locals know the real benefit of Elephant Rocks: its sunny, sheltered position. Thanks to a giant ring of boulders, which stand guard a little further out in the ocean, conditions are perfect for lazy days here spent sunning, swimming and picnicking on the sand.

To get here, follow the track from the car park and head down the wooden stairs, then squeeze between a slender rock crevasse, until… pop! You’ve arrived.

Elephant Rocks, William Bay National Park
Photo: Elephant Rocks, William Bay National Park

Fonty’s

Fonty’s might be responsible for the swimming skills of many locals around the town of Manjimup, but don’t be mistaken: this is no ordinary pool. The result of a dammed river, and surrounded by a crowd of giant weeping willows, Fonty’s is the picture-perfect swimming hole of your childhood dreams, complete with retro diving board, giant inflatable tyres and nearly an acre of inky-jewelled, silky soft water.

Aside from its beauty, Fonty’s has over 100 years of history going for it; a beloved local institution, it’s even been inscribed on the National Heritage Trust. Just be warned, to swim here you’ll need to pay the very serious entrance fee: a whole three dollars.

Fonty's Pool, Manjimup
Photo: Fonty's Pool, Manjimup

Twilight Cove, Esperance

You’ll be hard pressed to choose which swimming spot is your favourite around Esperance – there are literally dozens of coves, rock pools and beaches to explore. At the start of the Great Ocean Drive – a 20-kilometre road that wends its way out of town, and along the coast – you’ll find one of the best.

Twilight Cove is home to aquamarine water and a scattering of large granite rocks creating a secluded cove, that’s perfect for lolling about in the afternoon sun. Cupped by the area’s trademark fine white sand, and flanked by dunes and the ocean, it’s a gorgeous spot to watch the sun begin to dip. Finish the afternoon, craft beer in hand, at the nearby Lucky Bay Brewing, or loop back into town for an open-air Negroni at Taylor Street Quarters.

Twilight Cove, Esperance
Photo: Twilight Cove, Esperance

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